Nick Hundley

Students attend a tour at the renovated Behavioral Science Laboratory on Thursday afternoon. The laboratory is open to communication faculty and students for analyzing human behavior and interactions.

Photo Credit: Yamel Thompson | Daily Texan Staff

Newly renovated state-of-the-art experimental and laboratory rooms now fill the first floor of Communication Building B of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center. 

The Behavioral Science Laboratory opened April 1 for College of Communication faculty and student research within the communication realm. Since the opening, two researchers are currently conducting experiments.

According to Nick Hundley, the College of Communication director of communications, the renovation created five experimental rooms for conducting research, a control room to monitor the research being conducted, a survey stimulus room, focus group suite, a natural viewing room and a waiting room for participants. Every research room is equipped with audio and video monitoring capability.

Hundley said College of Communication graduate and undergraduate students working with a faculty advisor may use the lab to conduct research.

“The lab enables the scientific study of human behavior and will be used for the study of human interaction, person-to-person conversation and group interaction,” Hundley said. “Researchers are able to capture digital feeds from cameras and microphones to later code and analyze.”

The laboratory is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Reservations for spaces in the lab can be made as early as 60 days in advance but no less than 14 days before the the research begins. Researchers must reserve online and are only allowed to schedule a maximum of 24 hours a week.

Veronica Inchauste, program coordinator of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, led a tour of the Behavioral Science Lab on Thursday. During the tour she said groups trying to use the space must provide their Institutional Review Board number and researchers must attend a mandatory orientation to learn about laboratory usage. She said these policies will allow for maximum efficiency.

“Before we created any of the policies, I did a lot of research on the use of research labs around the country so that we would make sure there is an efficient use of the space,” Inchauste said. “We want to make sure it is being used efficiently and not used sitting there without anyone using it. This laboratory allows for flexibility for any kind of research.”

Communication Studies professor Brenda Berkelaar said she is hopeful that in the next couple of years she will conduct research in the laboratory.

“I am excited that we have space available that’s flexible that can account for a lot of different research questions and opportunities that the faculty and students here have,” Berkelaar said. “I believe the lab will give students an opportunity to have a richer understanding of some of the research process and how what we do can actually have impact.”

Photo Credit: Yamel Thompson | Daily Texan Staff

Newly renovated state-of-the-art experimental and laboratory rooms now fill the first floor of Communication Building B of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center. 

The Behavioral Science Laboratory opened April 1 for College of Communication faculty and student research within the communication realm. Since the opening, two researchers are currently conducting experiments.

According to Nick Hundley, the College of Communication director of communications, the renovation created five experimental rooms for conducting research, a control room to monitor the research being conducted, a survey stimulus room, focus group suite, a natural viewing room and a waiting room for participants. Every research room is equipped with audio and video monitoring capability.

Hundley said College of Communication graduate and undergraduate students working with a faculty advisor may use the lab to conduct research.

“The lab enables the scientific study of human behavior and will be used for the study of human interaction, person-to-person conversation and group interaction,” Hundley said. “Researchers are able to capture digital feeds from cameras and microphones to later code and analyze.”

The laboratory is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Reservations for spaces in the lab can be made as early as 60 days in advance but no less than 14 days before the the research begins. Researchers must reserve online and are only allowed to schedule a maximum of 24 hours a week.

Veronica Inchauste, program coordinator of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, led a tour of the Behavioral Science Lab on Thursday. During the tour she said groups trying to use the space must provide their Institutional Review Board number and researchers must attend a mandatory orientation to learn about laboratory usage. She said these policies will allow for maximum efficiency.

“Before we created any of the policies, I did a lot of research on the use of research labs around the country so that we would make sure there is an efficient use of the space,” Inchauste said. “We want to make sure it is being used efficiently and not used sitting there without anyone using it. This laboratory allows for flexibility for any kind of research.”

Communication Studies professor Brenda Berkelaar said she is hopeful that in the next couple of years she will conduct research in the laboratory.

“I am excited that we have space available that’s flexible that can account for a lot of different research questions and opportunities that the faculty and students here have,” Berkelaar said. “I believe the lab will give students an opportunity to have a richer understanding of some of the research process and how what we do can actually have impact.”

Above Kingfish, a sculpture by Peter Reginato, construction workers install projectors for a new public art installation on the roof of the William Randolph Hearst building Tuesday afternoon. The art installation will be featured in a dedication to Walter Cronkite in front of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Complex.

Photo Credit: Shea Carley | Daily Texan Staff

In the 1930s, famed journalist Walter Cronkite walked the 40 Acres as a college student, fraternity member and Daily
Texan writer .

Cronkite went on to have an extraordinary career in journalism, serving as the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News and winning numerous prestigious awards throughout his life. UT will dedicate the Walter Cronkite Plaza in front of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Complex in his memory on April 19.

Nick Hundley, director of communications for the College of Communication, said the dedication will feature a new public art installation by artist Ben Rubin, titled “And That’s the Way It Is,” in honor of Cronkite. Hundley said the College worked with Landmarks, the University’s public art program, to commission the art installation.

“And That’s the Way It Is” will project text drawn from Cronkite’s archived broadcasts as well as daily news, Hundley said, and will be visible to anyone walking by.

“The College of Communication is honoring the traditional values of journalism that Walter Cronkite epitomized — accuracy, courage, independence and integrity,” Hundley said.

Hundley said other departments on campus contributed to the project, including the School of Information and the Briscoe Center for American History, which compiled archived transcripts from its Walter Cronkite papers.

School of Journalism associate director Wanda Garner Cash said the dedication commemorates one of UT’s most distinguished former students.

“Even though [Cronkite] has been out of journalism for a long time, his name still denotes strong commitment to the core journalism values we’re trying to inspire in our students,” she said.

Frank Serpas, Texas Student Media operations manager, said the technical equipment needed for the projection is still being installed before it’s revealed in a couple of weeks. Six projectors are installed on the roof of the building, he said, and construction teams had to drill into the roof to run power through it.

Communication Council President Patrick White said he feels the Cronkite dedication will serve as a source of pride for the College of Communication, as well as the rest of the University.

“It gives a sense of credibility to what we do in a very soft way,” he said. “Walter Cronkite is a name that is known nationally, and I think it lives up to the hopes and desires we have for our majors, especially journalism.”

Printed on Wednesday, April 4, 2012 as: Cronkite honored with plaza dedication