Navy

From the Archives: 1963 Cotton Bowl

“Darrell, that was a beautiful game- and there’s no damn doubt who’s Number One…” The leathery old admiral shoved through the maze of sports writers to congratulate Texas Coach Darrell Royal.  The Navy had sunk, 28-6.

Wayne Hardin, the fleet field mentor who had blasted off like the big guns on the battleship Arizona, had fired his last shot just before kickoff.

“When the challenger meets the champion, and the challenger wins, then there is a new champion.”

These were convincing words- and had sailing been considerably better, Hardin might have been some kind of prophet.

That Other Side

But as Sonny Liston said to Floyd Patterson, there’s another side to the coin.  When the challenger meets the champion and the champion bursts the little bubble of the challenger, then there ain’t no new champ.

Or to put it in Darrell Royal’s words: “We’re ready…”

The story ironically ends where it began.  On the hard, sunny field at Dallas most people call the Cotton Bowl.  Navy has other names for it.

It was here that Roger Staubach met an inspired SMU team that matched him score for score- winning 32-28, and knocking Navy from the unbeaten ranks.  The next day a team from the South silenced other roars of confidence and became the nation’s top team.

No Doubt Now

Only Hardin and eastern sportswriters, who believe the rest of the football world exists only to provide slaughter lambs for their babies, had any doubt to Texas’s right to be there.  Truly it should be hard to doubt now.

For seven tension-filled weeks Texas clung to that position.  The Steers had been here twice in successive years- and each time went down.  This time there would be no falling.

The ire of the east might have been justified by a weak performance on national television against A&M, except that their pet, Navy, should by all rights have been beaten by Army.

But Texas was lambasted as “fraud,” “unable to pass,” and generally not what it was cracked up to be.

Staubach was shadowed

Roger Staubach, Navy’s great quarterback, was plainly shadowed by Duke Carlisle.  But the real victory came not in Carlisle’s usual great play, but in the same old thing that won for Texas all year.

Staubach, great as he might be, has considerable trouble scoring when he doesn’t have the football.  And he also has problems when he’s sitting on the barnacles of Navy blue and gold.  That latter of course, has also to do with Appleton, Brucks, McWilliams and their cohorts sanding on top of him.

As to the game itself, Navy jostled things just a little with an eight-man line.  That clogged up the middle and seemingly said to Carlisle, “Go ahead, you can’t throw.”  But he did.

Harris Scampered

And Phil Harris, the Duke’s chief receiver last spring in the intra-squad game, circled under the first toss, left a Navy defender searching for his bell-bottoms, and scampered away to touchdown.

The sheer shock was enough to upset even most Texas fans, but there it was, 58 yards in one long bomb that struck seamen amidships.

Navy still had hopes on making it another scoring battle when the Middies got the ball.  Staubach would show them.

But the vicious rush by Texas started a bad, bad afternoon for Jolly Roger. He gained eight yards, lost 55 and ended up -47.

And the Navy’s not famous for retreating.

Appleton was the main glory gainer- but the whole charging defense really killed Staubach.  Early in the game, however, one got the feeling Appleton was playing Staubach alone.  He would seemingly watch his every move, even in the huddle.  This should, to say the least, have been unnerving.

…Think I’ll Run

Somewhere along here the quarter ended, and Carlisle tried the other end of the field.  This time Harris took the ball off defender Pat Donnelly’s hand, saw Donnelly fall and looked around as if to say “I believe I’ll run with it…”  He did, and 63 yards later it was 14-0.  That includes two boots from Tony Crosby, who ended a perfect season at the PAT department.

By this time Navy was sinking slowly, but Carlisle added another tally on a nifty scamper on the option.  That made it 21-0, and as Navy marched upfield, TV announcers, trying to keep from losing their audience, heralded Staubach as “finding himself, and ready to really come back in the second half.”  He didn’t.

Fact was, Texas was giving up the short pass to keep from yielding the home run pass.

Wade warmed up

All this time, Royal had Tommy Wade, his star passer, warming up on the sidelines, just in case Navy let an aerial get away.

Rudely ruining the dreams of the nation’s television guys, Texas slowed Staubach’s comeback by taking the ball away from him, scoring again.

Finally Roger shoved his men across, but the try for two points failed.  Royal, now playing the fourth and fifth teams, let everybody have a chance.

Late in the final period, however, Navy started moving.

Enough nonsense, thought Texas, and in came the first team line.

The extent of the confidence was shown when Navy, having pushed deep into Texas territory, was caught offsides.

To accept the penalty would have made it first down and 15, a rejection made it second and five.  Texas declined, almost as if to say, “Okay Rog, make it if you can…” He couldn’t.

Texas took over, and shoved the ball to the six-inch line before time stopped the butchering.

Therefore it ended, just as it had started, Texas with the ball, cramming it down Navy’s throat.

Writers sing praises

Sportswriters across the nation sang the praises of the nation’s number one team.  There was no question now.

And Texas?  It was pretty calm about the whole thing.  Quiet contentment riled most of the players.  The thought seemed to be if anyone else questioned, let them come down here, too.  And there were no takers.

The Navy-the East- the world would have done well to heed the words of a St. Louis writer- penned two days after Navy’s first defeated.

“Who’s Number One?”

“It’s Texas, podner-and smile when you say that…”

Original date of publication: Jan. 5, 1964


“Darrell, that was a beautiful game- and there’s no damn doubt who’s Number One.” The leathery old admiral shoved through the maze of sports writers to congratulate Texas Coach Darrell Royal.  The Navy had sunk, 28-6. 
 

Wayne Hardin, the fleet field mentor who had blasted off like the big guns on the battleship Arizona, had fired his last shot just before kickoff. 

“When the challenger meets the champion and the challenger wins, then there is a new champion.”
 

These were convincing words- and had sailing been considerably better, Hardin might have been some kind of prophet.

That Other Side
But as Sonny Liston said to Floyd Patterson, there’s another side to the coin.  When the challenger meets the champion and the champion bursts the little bubble of the challenger, then there ain’t no new champ.

Or to put it in Darrell Royal’s words: “We’re ready.”
 

The story ironically ends where it began; on the hard, sunny field at Dallas most people call the Cotton Bowl.  Navy has other names for it. 

It was here that Roger Staubach met an inspired SMU team that matched him score for score- winning 32-28, and knocking Navy from the unbeaten ranks.  The next day a team from the South silenced other roars of confidence and became the nation’s top team.


No Doubt Now
Only Hardin and eastern sportswriters, who believe the rest of the football world exists only to provide slaughter lambs for their babies, had any doubt to Texas’s right to be there.  Truly it should be hard to doubt now.

 

For seven tension-filled weeks Texas clung to that position.  The Steers had been here twice in successive years- and each time went down.  This time there would be no falling. 

The ire of the east might have been justified by a weak performance on national television against A&M, except that their pet, Navy, should by all rights have been beaten by Army.

But Texas was lambasted as “fraud,” “unable to pass,” and generally not what it was cracked up to be. 


Staubach was shadowed
Roger Staubach, Navy’s great quarterback, was plainly shadowed by Duke Carlisle.  But the real victory came not in Carlisle’s usual great play, but in the same old thing that won for Texas all year.

 

Staubach, great as he might be, has considerable trouble scoring when he doesn’t have the football.  And he also has problems when he’s sitting on the barnacles of Navy blue and gold.  That latter of course, has also to do with Appleton, Brucks, McWilliams and their cohorts sanding on top of him.

As to the game itself, Navy jostled things just a little with an eight-man line.  That clogged up the middle and seemingly said to Carlisle, “Go ahead, you can’t throw.”  But he did.
 

Harris Scampered
And Phil Harris, the Duke’s chief receiver last spring in the intra-squad game, circled under the first toss, left a Navy defender searching for his bell-bottoms, and scampered away to touchdown. 

 

The sheer shock was enough to upset even most Texas fans, but there it was, 58 yards in one long bomb that struck seamen amidships. 

Navy still had hopes on making it another scoring battle when the Middies got the ball.  Staubach would show them. 
 

But the vicious rush by Texas started a bad, bad afternoon for Jolly Roger. He gained eight yards, lost 55 and ended up -47.

And the Navy’s not famous for retreating.
 

Appleton was the main glory gainer- but the whole charging defense really killed Staubach.  Early in the game, however, one got the feeling Appleton was playing Staubach alone.  He would seemingly watch his every move, even in the huddle.  This should, to say the least, have been unnerving.

I Think I’ll Run

Somewhere along here the quarter ended, and Carlisle tried the other end of the field.  This time Harris took the ball off defender Pat Donnelly’s hand, saw Donnelly fall and looked around as if to say “I believe I’ll run with it.”  He did, and 63 yards later it was 14-0. That includes two boots from Tony Crosby, who ended a perfect season at the PAT department.

By this time Navy was sinking slowly, but Carlisle added another tally on a nifty scamper on the option.  That made it 21-0, and as Navy marched upfield, TV announcers, trying to keep from losing their audience, heralded Staubach as “finding himself, and ready to really come back in the second half.”  He didn’t. 
 

Fact was, Texas was giving up the short pass to keep from yielding the home run pass.

Wade warmed up
All this time, Royal had Tommy Wade, his star passer, warming up on the sidelines, just in case Navy let an aerial get away.

Rudely ruining the dreams of the nation’s television guys, Texas slowed Staubach’s comeback by taking the ball away from him, scoring again.  Finally Roger shoved his men across, but the try for two points failed.  Royal, now playing the fourth and fifth teams, let everybody have a chance.

Late in the final period, however, Navy started moving. 
 

Enough nonsense, thought Texas, and in came the first team line. 

The extent of the confidence was shown when Navy, having pushed deep into Texas territory, was caught offsides.
 

To accept the penalty would have made it first down and 15, a rejection made it second and five.  Texas declined, almost as if to say, “Okay Rog, make it if you can.” He couldn’t.

Texas took over, and shoved the ball to the six-inch line before time stopped the butchering.
 

Therefore it ended, just as it had started, Texas with the ball, cramming it down Navy’s throat.

Writers sing praises Sportswriters across the nation sang the praises of the nation’s number one team.  There was no question now.

And Texas?  It was pretty calm about the whole thing.  Quiet contentment riled most of the players.  The thought seemed to be if anyone else questioned, let them come down here, too.  And there were no takers. 
 

The Navy, the East, the world would have done well to heed the words of a St. Louis writer - penned two days after Navy’s first defeated.

“Who’s Number One?”
 

“It’s Texas, podner and smile when you say that.”

World War II veteran and UT alumnus Frank Denius displays an old photograph of the ROTC students training corps found in a time capsule at the UT Club in the stadium on Wednesday. Denius helped opening the fifty-four year-old copper box which was found under the now torn-down ROTC building last week.

Photo Credit: Fanny Trang | Daily Texan Staff

A 54-year-old time capsule opened for the first time on Wednesday has given rare insight into the daily life and history of UT’s Reserve Officer Training Corps during the 1940s and 1950s.

World War II veteran and UT alumnus Frank Denius removed the time capsule’s lid to reveal a treasure trove of important historical documents. Among the books and paper was a 1957 senior ROTC manual personally endorsed by former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower and a history of the Navy ROTC from its inception in 1940 until 1957. The book included rare photographs and a letter from the 1954 Board of Regents approving the construction of a new purpose-built ROTC building.

Also in the box was a 1956 Air Force ROTC yearbook and a brief history of the Army ROTC following its establishment in 1947.

ROTC historians have long known of the time capsule’s existence but could only plan for its retrieval following the official decommissioning in August of the now destroyed ROTC building. The copper box was purposefully placed in a cornerstone during the building’s construction in 1957, which was later renamed to Russell A. Steindam Hall in 1972.

Steindam graduated from UT in 1968 and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1971 following his death during combat in Vietnam.

Army ROTC associate professor Jose Reyes, who presented the box to the committee, said there were no indications of the capsule’s contents prior to opening.

“I expected some of the students and faculty members to have written something about that time in the ROTC, but this is a very special find,” Reyes said. “I’m sure it was meant to be a surprise to whoever opened it.”

Demand was high for ROTC graduates in the 1940s immediately following World War II, with 325 students in the Naval unit alone, according to the documents. Now, all three ROTC units are composed of only 350 students campus-wide.

Maj. Butch Neuenschwander said the capsule’s contents would allow the Naval ROTC to fill some gaps in its history during World War II and the decade following.

“We have a library where we keep older yearbooks, but this is great for us. We don’t really have a whole lot of information covering 1940-56. This is history,” Neuenschwander said. “Our reunion is in a few weeks, and I guarantee some of the attending alumni are listed here in these books.”

Neuenschwander said talks to place another time capsule in the new, six-story liberal arts building are under way. Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC will be housed together in the $95.7 million building beginning in 2013.

Both the Navy and Army ROTC are having their annual reunions on Nov. 5.

Printed on Thursday, October 20th, 2011, as: Rare relics recovered in time capsule

UT alumnus Vice Adm. William H. McRaven leads the special operations team that killed Osama bin Laden

Photo Credit: Courtesy of U.S. Navy | Daily Texan Staff

Vice Adm. William H. McRaven, a 1977 UT journalism alumnus, commands the unit that planned and executed the raid that led to the killing of Osama bin Laden on Sunday.

McRaven took over leadership of the more than 60,000 troops in the Joint Special Operations Command in 2008. McRaven is a highly decorated Navy SEAL who participated in the Naval ROTC program while at UT. Awards during his 35-year career include the Bronze Star, Legion of Merit and Defense Superior Service Medal. McRaven is the highest-ranking active duty UT Naval ROTC graduate, according to a University press release from November.

“I was fascinated that somebody with a journalism degree had gone to special forces and been a SEAL,” said retired Adm. Bobby Inman, a professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. “He has demonstrated that he is truly a distinguished graduate of the University.”

Inman met McRaven when the vice admiral was honored at the UT-Oklahoma State University game in November as part of the 75th anniversary celebration of ROTC. The two men shared what life is like both in the Navy and as a veteran and discussed McRaven’s career opportunities. Inman said McRaven spoke highly of his experience at UT.

McRaven’s success as the commander of JSOC reflects the leadership and intelligence that Longhorn and ROTC graduates are known for, Inman said.

“They’re leaders. They’re quick on their feet, logical in their thinking, able to interact with people effectively so they can be first rate leaders,” he said. “It was such an easy flowing conversation, talking about activities and events around the world. It is clear he is a very, very bright guy.”

McRaven will take over as Special Operations Command Chief from Adm. Eric Olson. Olson was the first Navy SEAL to hold the post, and McRaven will be the second, Inman said. SOCOM oversees all of the U.S. military’s special operations units, including JSOC.

Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy Juan Garcia said the Navy’s large presence in Japan for relief, the American and European attacks on Libya and the continued burden of the Iraq War are proof of the branch’s continued relevance and necessity. About 100 people at the Texas Union came to hear Garcia speak as part of Navy Week when, in cities nationwide, members of the Navy work to show taxpayers the return on their investment, he said. The sailors will build homes for Habitat for Humanity, work in soup kitchens and visit hospitals and schools. “It couldn’t be a more timely week to come and tell the Navy story,” he said. “As we sit in this room on this beautiful campus, there are 22 Navy ships and a nuclear aircraft carrier off the coast of Japan doing disaster relief.” At the same time, he said, five Navy ships and two nuclear submarines are off the coast of Libya leading the international coalition to prevent the slaughter of civilians. The Navy also conducts research on global warming in the Arctic Ocean and provides medical care in poor countries. They send doctors to offer medical care, such as cleft surgeries and eyeglasses. He said this is in the interest of national security as well as humanitarian efforts because those shown the sympathy of the nation are more easily convinced that we are there to help. The International Speakers Association, who center around bringing people of international significance to UT to help students connect with the world, sponsored the event, said coordinator Sorit Ganguly. Ganguly said a large portion of the turnout were junior and senior members of the ROTC. Plan II senior Dane Miller said he attended in light of recent events in Libya that involve the Navy. “I view the navy as an important engine for economic growth,” he said. “I don’t think we should be making cuts.” French senior Peter Antosh said he was interested to see exactly what the Navy was doing. “I always want to see what America is up to,” he said. “I want to see how my future earnings will be spent.”