Jesse H. Jones Communication Center

Cheryl Cooky, sociology and women's studies associate professor at Purdue University, speaks about the underrepresentation of women in sports media coverage at the Moody College of Communication on Thursday afternoon.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan Staff

The underrepresentation of women in sports media coverage was the subject of a talk by Cheryl Cooky, sociology and women’s studies associate professor at Purdue University, at the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center on Thursday.

The talk, “Framing Silence: The Mainstream News Media Coverage of Sports,” was sponsored by the Moody College of Communication’s Texas Program in Sports and Media and is part of a series offered by the radio-television-film department. The series focuses on issues in sports covering topics including violence, performance-enhancing drugs and race.

Cooky said the absence of women’s sports in news media coverage speaks volumes about the current culture. 

“Silences are not simply the outcome of oppressive power relations,” Cooky said. “Sports can still serve as a site for oppression while also a site for empowerment.”

As part of a longitudinal study of men’s and women’s sports coverage in news media, Cooky and her colleagues have been collecting and releasing data on the issue every five years since 1989. The study has found that 100 percent of the lead stories concerned men’s sports. 

Cooky said since Title IX, which prevents discrimination based on sex and gender, was passed in 1972, more women are playing sports, but coverage of women’s sports has decreased.

“The increased participation of girls and women in sports has not been reflected in the news media coverage,” Cooky said. “Coverage of women’s sports is lower now than it was in 1989 when we started the study.”

Sociology associate professor Ben Carrington said he was upset when he learned about the small percentage of coverage for women’s sports.

“To say that this is getting better is not right — in fact, it’s getting worse,” Carrington said. “We’re slicing it at 1.8 percent right now, and that’s just unacceptable.”

Cooky said that although the objectification of women in sports has decreased since the late 1990s, she still hopes to see less “packaging” of women for men’s sports.

“What puts me to sleep at night is the thought that in getting this work out there and to the people who can bring it to the masses, we could impact a sense of consciousness and bring about some change,” Cooky said.

Students attend a tour at the renovated Behavioral Science Laboratory on Thursday afternoon. The laboratory is open to communication faculty and students for analyzing human behavior and interactions.

Photo Credit: Yamel Thompson | Daily Texan Staff

Newly renovated state-of-the-art experimental and laboratory rooms now fill the first floor of Communication Building B of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center. 

The Behavioral Science Laboratory opened April 1 for College of Communication faculty and student research within the communication realm. Since the opening, two researchers are currently conducting experiments.

According to Nick Hundley, the College of Communication director of communications, the renovation created five experimental rooms for conducting research, a control room to monitor the research being conducted, a survey stimulus room, focus group suite, a natural viewing room and a waiting room for participants. Every research room is equipped with audio and video monitoring capability.

Hundley said College of Communication graduate and undergraduate students working with a faculty advisor may use the lab to conduct research.

“The lab enables the scientific study of human behavior and will be used for the study of human interaction, person-to-person conversation and group interaction,” Hundley said. “Researchers are able to capture digital feeds from cameras and microphones to later code and analyze.”

The laboratory is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Reservations for spaces in the lab can be made as early as 60 days in advance but no less than 14 days before the the research begins. Researchers must reserve online and are only allowed to schedule a maximum of 24 hours a week.

Veronica Inchauste, program coordinator of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, led a tour of the Behavioral Science Lab on Thursday. During the tour she said groups trying to use the space must provide their Institutional Review Board number and researchers must attend a mandatory orientation to learn about laboratory usage. She said these policies will allow for maximum efficiency.

“Before we created any of the policies, I did a lot of research on the use of research labs around the country so that we would make sure there is an efficient use of the space,” Inchauste said. “We want to make sure it is being used efficiently and not used sitting there without anyone using it. This laboratory allows for flexibility for any kind of research.”

Communication Studies professor Brenda Berkelaar said she is hopeful that in the next couple of years she will conduct research in the laboratory.

“I am excited that we have space available that’s flexible that can account for a lot of different research questions and opportunities that the faculty and students here have,” Berkelaar said. “I believe the lab will give students an opportunity to have a richer understanding of some of the research process and how what we do can actually have impact.”

Photo Credit: Yamel Thompson | Daily Texan Staff

Newly renovated state-of-the-art experimental and laboratory rooms now fill the first floor of Communication Building B of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center. 

The Behavioral Science Laboratory opened April 1 for College of Communication faculty and student research within the communication realm. Since the opening, two researchers are currently conducting experiments.

According to Nick Hundley, the College of Communication director of communications, the renovation created five experimental rooms for conducting research, a control room to monitor the research being conducted, a survey stimulus room, focus group suite, a natural viewing room and a waiting room for participants. Every research room is equipped with audio and video monitoring capability.

Hundley said College of Communication graduate and undergraduate students working with a faculty advisor may use the lab to conduct research.

“The lab enables the scientific study of human behavior and will be used for the study of human interaction, person-to-person conversation and group interaction,” Hundley said. “Researchers are able to capture digital feeds from cameras and microphones to later code and analyze.”

The laboratory is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Reservations for spaces in the lab can be made as early as 60 days in advance but no less than 14 days before the the research begins. Researchers must reserve online and are only allowed to schedule a maximum of 24 hours a week.

Veronica Inchauste, program coordinator of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, led a tour of the Behavioral Science Lab on Thursday. During the tour she said groups trying to use the space must provide their Institutional Review Board number and researchers must attend a mandatory orientation to learn about laboratory usage. She said these policies will allow for maximum efficiency.

“Before we created any of the policies, I did a lot of research on the use of research labs around the country so that we would make sure there is an efficient use of the space,” Inchauste said. “We want to make sure it is being used efficiently and not used sitting there without anyone using it. This laboratory allows for flexibility for any kind of research.”

Communication Studies professor Brenda Berkelaar said she is hopeful that in the next couple of years she will conduct research in the laboratory.

“I am excited that we have space available that’s flexible that can account for a lot of different research questions and opportunities that the faculty and students here have,” Berkelaar said. “I believe the lab will give students an opportunity to have a richer understanding of some of the research process and how what we do can actually have impact.”

A student inspects construction on the Jesse H Jones Communication Center sixth floor Monday afternoon. Parts of the sixth and fourth floors are scheduled for renovation through August 20th.

Photo Credit: Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff

The Jesse H. Jones Communication Center’s (CMA) appearance is changing, with renovations that will make its interior resemble The Belo Center for New Media across the street. 

Renovations on the sixth and seventh floors have already been completed, and construction is now in progress on the north side of the fourth floor and south side of the sixth floor. Bob Rawski, regional program manager for the UT system, said when the College of Communication’s new building, the Belo Center, was installed, it was understood that other communications buildings like the CMA would have to be renovated. The renovations will cost $7 million dollars.

“We’re taking existing office space that hasn’t been upgraded since the building was constructed,” Rawski said.

Rawski said while the renovations are taking place, UT will also take the opportunity to do maintenance on the building’s air conditioning system, which is expected to fail due to age, and its wiring system. Rawski said the maintenance upgrades, which will cost $3.95 million, should pay themselves back quickly because of the increased efficiency of newer air conditioning units. Construction crews have installed temporary units to continue heating and cooling while the new system is installed.

Though the construction is intended to improve the building, students and staff on the floors under construction said the noise and activity can be disruptive.

“There’s a lot of banging,” journalism graduate student Grace Sherry, a teaching assistant with a discussion section on the fourth floor, said. “I either have to yell, literally scream or wait for it to stop.”

Lisa Bedore, a communications professor affected by the construction, also said she found it disruptive. However, she said the construction crews seem to have reduced their noise levels.

“As annoying as it is, I think they’re doing a better job of taking us into account,” Bedore said.

Rawski said he and the project’s other managers attempt to schedule the noisiest work for off-peak periods.

“In this particular project we had too much work to do just over the break periods,” Rawski said. “[But] we’ve been doing a lot of the noisiest work nights and weekends.”

Renovations on the CMA are scheduled to finish Aug. 20.

Published on February 6, 2013 as "CMA renovations progress, mirror Belo's modern look". 

Students huddle under the Far West bus stop near the intersection of Dean Keeton and Whitis Avenue Monday evening as heavy rain passed through the area. Thunderstorms are expected to continue throughout the week.

Photo Credit: Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff

Update at 2:00 p.m. - Tuesday evening thunderstorms amounted to an average of about .18 inches of rainfall on campus, saving UT about 313,043 gallons of water. The Tower’s rain gauge recorded .16 inches, the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center recorded 1.01 inches and the Facilities Complex’s recorded .2 inches. As of Wednesday there has been an average of 1.1 inches of rain on campus.

With precipitation and cooler temperatures to combat the scorching sun, students can break out the umbrellas and rejoice — the rain isn’t going anywhere for another day or two.

The UT campus received rain late Monday afternoon that continued into the evening. The campus got almost an inch of rain, which resulted in temperatures below 90 degrees. Markus Hogue, program coordinator of UT’s Irrigation and Water Conservation, said the campus saved approximately a week’s worth of water, or 1.6 million gallons, due to Monday’s rainfall. UT’s central irrigation system automatically shuts off its sprinklers when it rains, allowing it to detect whether it needs any more watering after precipitation.

Prior to midnight, UT’s central irrigation system, an advanced system that monitors and waters the campus’ landscape while reporting many different types of data, recorded an average of .92 inches of rain on Monday from its three different rain gauges. The one at the Tower reported .93 inches, Jesse H. Jones Communication Center’s gauge reported 1.01 inches and the Facilities Complex’s gauge reported .82 inches of rain.

Geography lecturer and KEYE meteorologist Troy Kimmel said he expected the weather to be rainy until Thursday due to a moist stable air mass that is working with a weak front.

“We could see another couple of inches of rain,” Kimmel said. “But by the time we get to the end of the week and the weekend, it is showing signs of drying out. I think the rain chances will be diminishing as we get into the weekend.”

Kimmel said he expects Travis County to experience temperatures lower than 90 degrees on Wednesday and temperatures in the mid-90s this Saturday.

“But as the rain chances go down and the sunshine kind of picks up late in the week and into the weekend, temperatures will get back up into middle 90s again,” Kimmel said.

Members of the Austin Fire Department test for chemicals and toxic gas levels in The Daily Texan office after being alerted of a suspicious odor. The smell was the result of industrial chemicals used to paint the former printing press room for University use.

Photo Credit: Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Daily Texan staff members sat on the plaza of the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center on Thursday evening after learning paint masks were not enough to protect them from potentially toxic fumes in their office.

The William Randolph Hearst Building was evacuated for about two hours because of painting in the room that formerly housed the Texan’s printing press.

“I’m the dean of the school. I understand about journalism deadlines, but I can’t be sure you all will be safe if you stay down here,” said College of Communication Dean Roderick Hart.

Within minutes, Jesse H. Jones Communication Center - Building A also had to be evacuated after someone pulled a fire alarm, said building services supervisor Jason Shoumaker.

Electrical engineering senior Tristan Jesse was in a photography class in the building when the alarm went off.
“I really just kind of laughed,” Jesse said. “I would guess someone was taking a final, and they didn’t want to finish it.”

As he strolls into class in the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center, he looks like any other student looking to get in a little last-minute studying before the day’s exam. But a few fellow students still recognize the 6-foot-5-inch man.

“Hey Kris, I watched you play,” someone will call out.

Kris Clack started for the Longhorns basketball team from 1996 to 1999, finishing his career seventh overall in scoring and fourth overall in rebounding in Texas history. He was named to the All-Big 12 second team his junior and senior years. After pursuing a professional career overseas and in the U.S., Clack is back at UT to finish his degree.

“Kris was a starter and our most consistent player from the day he walked into the door,” said former Texas head coach Tom Penders, who coached the Longhorns from 1988 to 1998.
The Boston Celtics took him with the 55th overall pick in the 1999 NBA draft. But after failing to land a roster spot, he decided to take his game to Italy.

“Real life set in, and I had to make money,” Clack said.

While Clack was a solid player in Italy, averaging 14.3 points a game over six seasons, he said his first year there was a bit of a culture shock.

“When I first got there it was hard to adjust to the language and culture,” Clack said. “It was the simple things that were the hardest, like going to the grocery store and not being able to buy cereal.”

The simple things didn’t include the crazy fans who would attend European games and were especially vulgar toward Americans, he said.

“The management was nervous of fans,” Clack said. “People would throw water on me and spit on me.”

Other Americans Clack played with had hot pennies thrown at them and fans sometimes shot off flares inside the arena in celebration.

The arenas in Europe, which often lacked temperature control, would feel scorching in the summer and freezing in the winter. And after halftime, players returned to a smoky gym.

“Everyone would light a cigarette at half, so the court would have a cloud of smoke when we came back for the second half,” Clack said.

Cultural differences aside, he still considers the skill level in Europe very high because the kids are placed in a skill academy at a young age and are fundamentally sound by the time they reach the pros.

“The coaches were hard on the players when they did something wrong,” Clack said. “Sometimes they’d get kicked in the shin [after making mistakes].”

He left Europe in 2006 to play for the Austin Toros in the newly formed NBA Development league.

“The overseas experience burned me out, and I knew eventually I’d be going back to school and playing in Austin gave me the opportunity to,” Clack said.

He played for the Toros for a year and then moved on to the New Mexico Thunderbirds the next year before retiring a few months later.

“I just didn’t like the coach; first time in my career I ever had a problem with one,” he said. “I said, ‘Screw it. I’m going home to my daughter and my family.’”

Clack is back at Texas now to get his undergraduate degree and teaching certificate with his eyes turned toward coaching. He aims to become a high school coach after finishing up his hours at UT, and is working as a coach with the Austin Wildcats, a development program for kids from fourth to 12th grade, and at St. Gabriel’s Catholic School, where he coaches seventh- and eighth-grade girls.

“Kris is a good coach because he is so patient with the girls,” said Darrel Smith, president of the Austin Wildcats.

Clack was a fundamentally sound player in his career and looks to emphasize the fundamentals in teaching a younger generation.

“I like the little kids that can’t dribble and shoot with two hands, I get a better feeling when I develop young talent,” he said.

While he’s focused on developing younger players, Clack still wishes he received more credit for what he did for the Texas program.

The conversation on Texas basketball often starts with Chris Mihm, a former Texas center and teammate who spent nine seasons in the NBA.

Clack, however, was the first McDonald’s All-American to commit to Texas. He averaged 13.3 points and 6.4 rebounds per game over four seasons.

“Not to say we didn’t have great players, but as soon as we went to the Big 12, the level of recruits went from second tier to the best in the country,” Penders said. “Kris was the one who started that trend.”