Winnie the Pooh

UT senior Leah Vela makes a sno-cone for a customer at Sno Beach on Tuesday afternoon. Vela said this week’s warmer weather has brought an increase in
business.

Photo Credit: Becca Rodriguez | Daily Texan Staff

Put simply, I am a snow cone connoisseur. When I was a kid, a snow cone stand painted with a picture of Winnie the Pooh sat around the corner from my house, and buying a snow cone there signaled both the beginning and end of summer.

As a college-bound 18 year old, I lived in a different house, but a snow cone stand still sat at the nearest H-E-B. In the weeks before I left for college I visited it every day, hell bent on tasting each and every one of the offered flavors.

Now, as a college student, I live mere blocks away from the Sno-Beach trailer on Guadalupe Street, and though I have not sampled every flavor, I am certainly a frequent patron. Below is a list of my favorite flavors at the three best snow cone stands in Austin, compiled by your truly.

1. Casey’s New Orleans Snowballs

Yes. It’s worth the drive. Casey’s tops the list because it has variety, not just of flavors, but also of add-ons and sizes — a big plus if you dislike getting the giant ‘small’ size at Sno-Beach. Casey’s flavors come in two varieties, cream and regular. The cream flavors have cream mixed in and taste like the perfect in-between: not quite ice cream, not quite snow cone, light enough for a summer day but heavy enough to support cream-based flavors like chocolate. The best of all is that despite all the variety, the service at Casey’s comes in one only one flavor: amazing. The employees are cheerful, helpful and make each snow cone like the treat is the only thing between you and a great day. Which, considering how good these snow cones are, it just might be.

2. Jim-Jim’s Italian Water Ice

No, a “water ice” is not a snow cone. The texture is, as you might suspect, more watery. But breaking tradition is forgivable because of the juicy, fresh-fruit flavors that Jim-Jim’s trades in. Get the mango or the strawberry, but skip the cream: It’s too thick, they put too much on and it ruins the light, juicy flavor of the treat.

3. Sno-Beach

At Sno-Beach, get a small — its sizes are larger than most — and order almond flavor with cream. Or peach with cream. Or horchata with cream. If you suspect the flavor would taste good when added to vanilla ice cream, adding the snow beach cream mix will make for a great combination.

Best snow cone in Austin

Put simply, I am a snow cone connoisseur. When I was a kid, a snow cone stand painted with a picture of Winnie the Pooh sat around the corner from my house, and buying a snow cone there signaled both the beginning and end of summer.

As a college-bound 18 year old, I lived in a different house, but a snow cone stand still sat at the nearest HEB. In the weeks before I left for college, I visited it every day, hell bent on tasting each and every one of the offered flavors.

Now, as a college student, I live mere blocks away from the Sno-Beach trailer on Guadalupe, and though I have not sampled every flavor, I am certainly a frequent patron. Below, find a list of the best flavors at the three best snow-cone stands in Austin, compiled by your truly.

1. Casey’s New Orleans SnowBalls on 51st and Airport

Yes. It’s worth the drive. Casey’s tops the list because it has variety, not just of flavors, but also of add-ons and sizes (a big plus if you dislike getting the giant ‘small’ size at Sno-Beach.) Casey’s flavors come in two varieties, cream and regular. The cream flavors have cream mixed in, and taste like the perfect in-between: not quite ice-cream, not quite snow cone, light enough for a summer day but heavy enough to support cream-based flavors like chocolate.  The best of all is that despite all the variety, the service at Casey’s comes in one only one flavor: amazing. The employees are cheerful, helpful, and make each snow cone like the treat is the only thing between you and a great day. Which, considering how good these snow cones are, it just might be.

2. Jim-Jim’s Water Ice on Sixth

No, a “water ice” is not a snow cone. The texture is, as you might suspect, more watery, but their breaking tradition is forgivable because of the juicy, fresh-fruit flavors that Jim-Jim’s trades in. Get the mango or the strawberry, but skip the cream: it’s too thick, they put too much on, and it ruins the light, juicy flavor of the treat.

3. Sno-Beach on Guadalupe

At sno-beach, get a small (their sizes are larger then most), and order Almond flavor with cream. Or peach with cream. Or horchata with cream. If you suspect the flavor would taste good when added to vanilla ice cream, adding the snow beach cream mix will make for a great combination.

Crowds of fairy wings, tutus and an occasional look-a-like “Winnie the Pooh” character headed down to the heart of Pease Park on Saturday. Tribal drumming became more distinct and fiesta-style, tissue-paper flowers decorated every tree and shrub in sight.

A.A. Milne’s “Winnie the Pooh” story has inspired the Eeyore’s Birthday Party event for 47 years. The storybook characters pull together spontaneous fun to surprise the poor, depressed donkey, who believes all have forgotten his birthday. Austin crowds join with Piglet, Christopher Robin and Pooh for a spring birthday party.

In 1963, UT students Lloyd Birdwell and Jean Craver, along with English professor James Ayres, latched onto this story. Boosted by spring fever, they started picnicking with a keg and children’s games on an unspecified Friday in May. The only hint that the party was happening was Piglet’s birthday gift to Eeyore — a single red balloon.

The picnic grew into a festival attracting people from all over Austin from hippies to families with children.

“There is nothing like Eeyore’s,” said annual attendee Chris Ogerly. “You hear about [these people and activities] in Austin, but you don’t get to see them all the time.”

The attendees kept the celebration’s connection to childhood memories, bringing out Hula-hoops and bubbles and donning fanciful costumes. Children added to the carefree environment by making crafts and by tying Travis Watkins, a UT computer science alumnus, to a May Pole.

Children held colorful plastic ribbons attached to a large pole. Under Watkins’ supervision, they were instructed to walk clockwise. Rebelling against such strict instructions, several of the boys took off in the wrong direction. Watkins soon became bound, surrounded by small children gloating over their victory.

Up the hill from the May Pole, adults upheld the giddy, childlike attitude. Spontaneous drum circles broke out around women wearing tutus and acrylic painted-on bras, hipster college students and a single frat boy in Round-Up sunglasses.

“[Eeyore’s Birthday Party] makes Austin the type of place I want to live in,” said Scott Sexton, president of the Friends of the Forrest Foundation, the organization that runs the party. “The people that show up are the lifeblood of Eeyore’s Birthday, and of Austin itself.”