Celebrities increase popularity of mustaches

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Iconic men with trendsetting mustaches have shaped the way we have shaved our faces since the dawn of the razor, and from Salvador Dalí to Johnny Depp, it is clear that with a great mustache comes great responsibility.

How do we find the perfect mustache to express our personality and intrinsic qualities without looking like Albert Einstein’s and Friedrich Nietzsche’s mustaches joined forces and grew on our upper lip? The answer is simple: Visit a good barber. If you’re simply playing with the idea of joining the ranks of legendary mustachioed men, then reviewing styles that have come and gone is a good way to start your journey to the mustache hall of fame.

The most popular style in modern mustache trends is the simple “Don Corleone,” which has been resurrected by A-lister Brad Pitt. He started to wear this mustache in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds,” and has kept the same ‘stache for everyday wear and red carpet events. The “Don Corleone” is a classic, and those who wear it will surely make you an offer you can’t refuse.

One of the most celebrated and distinctive mustaches known to man belonged to the disturbed yet brilliant Spanish surrealist artist Dalí. Although his slim, long, pointy mustache can hardly be replicated by men today, Dalí’s mustache inspired former Major League Baseball player Rollie Fingers, who holds the unofficial honor for having the best mustache of modern times.

Since the Dalí ‘stache can only be pulled off by a small demographic, another iconic mustache we can adopt is that of 1920s actor Warner Baxter.

Baxtor’s Great Gatsby-esque mustache is prevalent in Dolce & Gabbana’s 2011 Spring Summer ads and suits a suave, debonair man quite nicely. This clean-cut, thin and groomed mustache is perfect for the bold and fashionable graduating senior who demands respect when walking into an interview yet has an unwavering charm that transcends barriers.

The American Mustache Institute claims that men with mustaches are often discriminated against, so even if you do walk into an interview with a perfect in-vogue ‘stache, you may turn heads, but not in a good way.

Chairman Aaron Perlut said the institute is working to replace negative stigmas attached to American men wearing facial hair. A recent increase of men wearing mustaches has helped dilute these problems, he said.

“In the 1980s, only 19 percent of men wore a mustache or beard, whereas now nearly 36 percent of men sport one or both,” Perlut said.
The growing percentage of men with facial hair can partly be attributed to modern celebrities bringing the ‘stache back in style.

The idiosyncratic mustache style sported by Academy Award winner Daniel Day-Lewis for his role in “There Will Be Blood” has spawned a trend of individuals looking to make a bolder statement in modern times. His thick handlebar fits the vintage Americana mold, and since the movie was released, Robert Downey Jr., Mel Gibson and John Travolta have also sported similar styles while walking the red carpet.

Mister Hamilton, sideshow performer at Austin’s Museum of the Weird, has received numerous accolades for his Day-Lewis-inspired mustache. He said this particular style took root years ago when he realized that the mustache didn’t wear him; he wore the mustache. Hamilton’s Facebook fan page shows a striking black and white picture of him showing off his full handlebar with ends curled to a fine, perfect point.

“There are people that rent their mustaches and people who own them, and in order to pull off your mustache well, you have to own it,” Hamilton said.

Whether you can grow a full wise man’s beard or just a few whiskers, reflecting on the celebrities that best fit your personality is a terrific way to decide how to shape your new ‘stache.