• UT professor Richard Cherwitz's hearing for a hit-and-run charge was pushed back to July 17. According to the Travis County court docket, Cherwitz had a hearing scheduled earlier this morning. This is the second time Cherwitz's hearing has been rescheduled.  

    On March 26, police say Cherwitz was involved in a hit-and-run on the intersection of West 10th Street and Lamar Blvd, leaving one bicyclist injured. He was subsequently arrested and charged with failure to stop and render aid, a 3rd degree felony.

    Paul Quinzi, Cherwitz's attorney, could not be reached for comment. 

  • While UT administrators breathe a sigh of relief after today’s ruling from the Supreme Court on the case of Fisher v. University of Texas, administration at University of Michigan is cautiously examining the impact of the case on their own admissions policy.

    The court, which found the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had not sufficiently reviewed UT’s admissions policy under the standards of strict scrutiny, has sent the case back to the appeals court for review. The high body also upheld the precedent of using of race in admissions as a compelling state interest, a "pleasing result," according to UT President William Powers Jr. 

    For now the ruling means the University and the next incoming class will be able to use race as a factor in admissions, although the University may be held to a tighter standard of disclosure for its use of admissions in the future.

    Such a decision means there will also be no immediate changes at the University of Michigan, which, ten years ago, successfully fought to uphold the use of race in admissions in the 2003 Supreme Court case Grutter v. Bollinger. Today, the university cannot use race as a factor in admissions because of a 2006 voter initiative that ended the practice, although that ruling is currently being challenged in the upcoming Supreme Court case Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action.

    University of Michigan’s president, Mary Sue Coleman, praised the Supreme Court’s decision Monday in a statement.

    “At the University of Michigan, we remain committed to building and maintaining diversity on our campus, and we will continue to work toward that goal in ways that comply with state and federal law,” Coleman said.

    The Michigan case, which will be heard by the court this fall, will examine whether or not a state’s ruling to prohibit the consideration of race or gender in admissions violates guarantees of equal protection under the U.S. Constitution.

  • After UT President William Powers Jr. responded to the Supreme Court of the United States ruling in Fisher v. Texas, student leaders remain in support of the University and current holistic review admissions.

    Powers said the ruling, as it stands, will not impact the class of 2013 or 2014 admissions process.

    David Sanchez, Community Development co-director for Multicultural Engagement Center, said the ruling caused a lot of confusion.

    “When the decision came out, there was a lot of confusion as to what happened or what decision the court made,” Sanchez said. “As a minority, I see affirmative action as a good thing and they’re sticking with the admissions process.”

    Andrew Clark, Senate of College Council president, said although the Senate did not pass official legislation, many students support the University’s race-conscious admission process.

    “We’re still viewing this as a positive and we’ll continue to try and promote diversity regardless of what the fifth circuit might say and what will happen down the road,” Clark said.

    Ugeo Williams, Student Government vice president, said he and Horacio Villarreal, SG president, plan to address the student body in a campus wide email on the topic and to encourage students to back the University’s policy.

    “We’re all still reviewing the case because it's important not only at the administrative level, but students also need to know what this means,” Williams said. “There is more energy to bring forth to continue to rally in support.”

    Sanchez said most students are not currently informed about the case or its potential impact on student diversity.

    “I wanted to stay informed and stay up with the case,” Sanchez said. “There are people asking what students think about the case and nobody seems to know about it although it’s an issue that affects everyone. A lot of people at the University have the mentality that if it doesn’t affect them it doesn’t matter, but in reality it affects the reputation of the University.”

    Follow Christine Ayala on Twitter @christine_ayala.

  • After UT President William Powers Jr. responded to the Supreme Court of the United States ruling in Fisher v. Texas, student leaders remain in support of the University and current holistic review admissions.

    Powers said the ruling, as it stands, will not impact the class of 2013 or 2014 admissions process.

    David Sanchez, Community Development co-director for Multicultural Engagement Center, said the ruling caused a lot of confusion.

    “When the decision came out there was a lot of confusion as to what happened or what decision the court made,” Sanchez said. “As a minority, I see affirmative action as a good thing and they’re sticking with the admissions process.”

    Andrew Clark, Senate of College Council president, said although Senate did not pass official legislation, many students support the University’s race-conscious admission process.

    “We’re still viewing this as a positive and we’ll continue to try and promote diversity regardless of what the fifth circuit might say and what will happen down the road,” Clark said.

    Ugeo Williams, Student Government vice president, said he and Horacio Villarreal, SG president, plan to address the student body in a campus wide email on the topic and to promote students to back the University’s policy.

    “We’re all still reviewing the case because its important not only at the administrative level but students also need to know what this means,” Williams said. “There is more energy to bring forth to continue to rally in support.”

    Sanchez said most students are not currently informed about the case or its potential impact on student diversity.

    “I wanted to stay informed and stay up with the case,” Sanchez said. “There are people asking what students think about the case and nobody seems to now about it although it’s an issue that effects everyone. A lot of people at the University have the mentality that if it doesn’t effect them it doesn’t matter, but in reality it effects the reputation of the University.”

    Follow Christine Ayala on Twitter @christine_ayala.

  • At a press conference in Washington D.C., Edward Blum, the director of the Project on Fair Representation, said the ruling on Fisher v. Texas is a "win" for those who are opposed to affirmative action or race conscious admissions policies. 

    Early Monday morning, the Supreme Court released a ruling on Fisher v. Texas, the supreme court case that challenged UT's policy of using race in admissions. The Supreme Court sent the case back to a lower court, in a 7-1 decision.

    UT President William Powers Jr. and others have said the rulling is a win for the University and affirmative action supporters, but Blum contradicted that Monday afternoon, claiming the ruling was a loss for the UT.

    "I can't speak for the other side...if they're excited for this ruling I think they're gravely misplaced," Blum said. "I think it is quite clear the justices demand schools seek race-neutral policies."

    Fisher gave a brief statement about how she was honored to be apart of this process. 

    "I am very confident UT won't be able to use race as a factor in admissions in the future," Fisher said.

    Related Content:

    Supreme Court sends Fisher v. Texas case back to lower court" 

    "TIMELINE: Affirmative action in United States through the years" 

    "TIMELINE: History of Fisher v. Texas case" 

    "UT student body President Horacio Villarreal comments on Fisher ruling" 

    "5 quotes you got to see from the Supreme Court's ruling on Fisher v. Texas" 

    "Abigail Fisher, Edward Blum says Fisher v. Texas court decision is a 'win'"

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