Abigail Fisher needs to get over it

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Abigail Fisher, a rejected undergraduate UT applicant, filed a petition Tuesday for her case, Fisher v. University of Texas, to be heard by the Supreme Court for a second time.
Abigail Fisher, a rejected undergraduate UT applicant, filed a petition Tuesday for her case, Fisher v. University of Texas, to be heard by the Supreme Court for a second time.

Abigail Fisher and her lawyers are bringing her case to the US Supreme Court for a second time. Abigail Fisher and her lawyers need to move on. 

Fisher is painted by her legal team as a victim of being white in a world that favors minorities. It's ridiculous. A successful and valuable University seeks diversity in order to enhance the overall quality of education for its students. Imagine going to a school where everyone was white, served as president of NHS and played cello in their high school orchestra. It would be unbearable. The stock of college applicants that fit this demographic is high. Distinguishing factors are necessary, but sadly not everyone has them. 

Many college applicants are under the false impression that being involved in many extracurriculars and striving for high standardized testing scores are these distinguishing factors and their ticket to a good university, but they're wrong. 

Suzy Lee Weiss wrote an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal in 2013 criticizing the competitive colleges that rejected her. Weiss ponders the ways she could have solved her lack of diversity in her applications — "Show me to any closet, and I would've happily come out of it... I also probably should have started a fake charity. Providing veterinary services for homeless people's pets. Collecting donations for the underprivileged chimpanzees of the Congo. " 

Weiss' poor attitude represents the problem I have with Abigail Fisher's case and the formulaic college application mindset: They share an assumption that anyone who is passionate enough about a cause to start their own charity, anyone who came to terms with their sexuality or anyone who showed an honest and true passion in a specific field did so only to aid their chances of getting into their school of choice. I would hope admissions counselors would accept someone who has made an effort to better the world over a senior class president if it came down to it. 

A formula for a guaranteed college acceptance does not exist. A proven passion in a specialized area is preferable to serving a leadership position for the sake of upping a resume. Abigail Fisher attended and graduated from Louisiana State University, rejecting an offer of attending a satellite UT campus with the option of transferring later. Why she chose to obsess over her semi-rejection from a competitive University enough to take a faulty case to the Supreme Court not once, but twice, is lost on me.