Non-citizen encourages civic duty, supports Clinton

AddThis

History freshman Shannon Doyle, originally from London, is unable to vote in the presidential election. Doyle urges others to vote, and believes that a Trump presidency could damage U.S. relations.
Photo Credit: Jenan Taha | Daily Texan Staff

Shannon Doyle isn’t eligible to cast her ballot this election cycle by nature of not being an American citizen, but encourages others with the right to do so.

Originally from London, Doyle has called Texas home for the last eight years, and said politics has always played an integral role in her life.

Doyle, an international relations and global studies freshman, said she supports Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton regardless of her inability to vote, mainly because of Clinton’s stance on issues such as education, immigration and healthcare.  

“Healthcare is a thing in England for everyone,” Doyle said. “My family for the longest time couldn’t afford healthcare here in the States, and even though there are problems with Obamacare, it helped my family, and we can afford it now.”

By contrast, Republican nominee Donald Trump has called for an immediate repeal and replacement of Obamacare.

“My parents have said they’re moving back [to London] if Trump wins the presidency,” Doyle said, adding with a laugh that she’d be here at the University to continue her studies.

Additionally, Doyle said Trump was a “terrible misogynist,” and that his past remarks were unacceptable. 

“As Americans, we’re supposed to look up to the president and regard him as an example for all of the United States,” Doyle said. “I don’t think I could do that at all if Trump is president.” 

Doyle, who was in London leading up to Brexit — a June referendum that resulted in the United Kingdom voting to leave the European Union 52 to 48 percent — said the results surprised her, and Americans needed to learn from the unexpected dangers in elections.

“What Americans need to take into account from Brexit is that what you think will happen might not,” Doyle said. “You need to vote, because if you don’t, it’s going to sway the way you don’t want it to.”