Several Longhorns selected in MLB draft

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Former Longhorn catcher Tres Barrera takes a swing during a game against the Kansas Jayhawks in April. Barrera was selected to join the Washington Nationals during the MLB draft on Friday.

Photo Credit: Mike McGraw | Daily Texan Staff

Updated 2:10 p.m. CST Sunday: Two more Longhorns were selected in the final day of the MLB draft. Sophomore pitcher Morgan Cooper was selected by the Washington Nationals in round 34. Infielder Bret Boswell went in round 40 after being taken by the Pittsburgh Pirates.

A pair of Longhorns were selected on the second day of the MLB draft on Friday. Catcher Tres Barrera and pitcher Ty Culbreth were taken in rounds six and eight, respectively.

Barerra went off the board first, joining the Washington Nationals. The Eagle Pass native served as Texas’ starting catcher and emotional leader for much of his time in Austin. He quickly became one of former head coach Augie Garrido’s clubhouse anchors upon his arrival to the 40 Acres in 2013.

Despite consistent struggles from a significant portion of Texas’ roster, Barrera did not disappoint during his junior season in 2016. He ended the year leading the Longhorns with 37 RBIs while making appearances at five different positions. If he can parlay his college accolades into professional success, Barrera has the tools to shoot up the Nationals’ system.

Culbreth was selected by the Colorado Rockies two rounds later. Culbreth improved in all four of his seasons at Texas, transforming from an unreliable reliever to the staff’s unquestioned ace.

In his senior year in Austin, Culbreth was named to the All-Big 12 Conference second team. He won eight games for the burnt orange and ended the year with career highs in innings and strikeouts.

Culbreth and Barrera were the lone selections off Texas’ 2016 roster. However, numerous Longhorns commits were taken as well, including Gatorade National Player of the Year Kyle Muller. So while Texas celebrates the selections of Culbreth and Barrera, it will hold its breath and await the decisions of its high-school commits.