ESB hears complaint from SG candidate against Daily Texan associate editor

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Journalism and economics senior David Maly, right, filed a complaint to the Election Supervisory Board claiming that Plan II junior Alexander Chase maliciously filed an inaccurate complaint regarding the Helgren-Kim campaign. Supreme Court Chief Justice Zach Stone, left, attended Tuesday’s hearing to clarify any questions from the board regarding the court’s decision.

Photo Credit: Mary Pistorius | Daily Texan Staff

The Election Supervisory Board heard a complaint Tuesday from a candidate for Student Government communication representative, who claims an associate editor for The Daily Texan had malicious intentions when filing an inaccurate complaint against the Helgren-Kim campaign.

During Tuesday’s hearing, journalism and economics senior David Maly alleged Plan II junior Alexander Chase, the sole candidate for Daily Texan editor-in-chief, had misrepresented himself during his two hearings in front of the ESB and the SG Supreme Court. 

Maly said Chase had agreed with the Supreme Court’s ruling, but repeatedly stood by his initial complaint during Tuesday’s hearing.

“As we saw, there were half a dozen new contradictions from [Chase] during this hearing,” Maly said. “If anything, I think this strengthened my complaint that he’s being dishonest here.”

Chase initially submitted a complaint against the Helgren-Kim campaign for what he perceived as early campaigning and soliciting of support from a sitting member of the editorial board. ESB first heard the complaint, ruling unanimously in favor of Chase. 

“I submitted this wanting to understand how to go about it,” Chase said during Tuesday’s hearing. “I felt that the Election Supervisory Board would have been able to guide me on this. I felt fairly strongly that there was something rotten … that ‘support’ there did not seem like work.”

After Helgren-Kim appealed the ESB ruling, the Supreme Court overturned the ESB’s decision, ruling the Helgren-Kim campaign had not committed any election code violation. 

Supreme Court Chief Justice Zach Stone attended Tuesday’s hearing to clarify any questions from the board regarding the court’s decision.

“The Supreme Court does not have jurisdiction over Texas Student Media elections, but we do share an election code,” Stone said in a statement Monday. “If we heard this case we would seriously consider Mr. Chase’s disqualification.” 

The campaign had to have known or found out about his position on the Texan’s editorial board through his Facebook page when he was approached for support, Chase said.

A decision from the board should come at approximately 9 p.m. tomorrow night, 24 hours after the hearing, board members said.